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  • A. Quincy Jones Restoration - West Side Home Tour

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  • A. Quincy Jones Restoration - West Side Home Tour

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  • A. Quincy Jones Restoration - West Side Home Tour

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  • A. Quincy Jones Restoration - West Side Home Tour

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  • A. Quincy Jones Restoration - West Side Home Tour

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A. Quincy Jones Restoration

Los Angeles, CA


West Side Home Tour
Sunday, June 24, 2012


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This project is an extensive restoration / remodel of a custom residence by mid-century architects A. Quincy Jones and Frederick E. Emmons. The project was to restore and preserve original materials wherever possible and, if changes were required, to avoid altering the architecturally significant elements and character of the house. Damaged elements, which threatened the well-being of the building (such as rotted wood structural elements, rusted plumbing, etc.) were replaced. Original materials (exterior acoustic paneling, wood paneling, sliding window frames) were exhaustively researched in order to provide exact replacements. The mechanical systems (radiant heating) were repaired and upgraded as needed. Areas which were not built according to the original floor plan, were reconfigured to meet the requirements of the new owner. The original footprint and massing of the house were maintained. Other building systems that did not previously exist (such as air conditioning) were added as discretely as possible. For example, a mini-duct system (2-1/2" diameter ducting), similar to what was installed in the White House, now provides secondary heating and air conditioning through small inconspicuous vent holes in the ceiling without adding soffits. The project advances historic preservation in Los Angeles County by adding another significant work to the roster of preserved modernist houses, icons such as the Barnsdall House, Schindler House, Eames House, and the Chemosphere. It serves as an example of how historic buildings can continue to be successfully used by a new generation of owners, saved from demolition, while maintaining the significant character of the building.

About the Architect


Missing
Escher GuneWardena Architecture


www.egarch.net


Escher GuneWardena’s work has been published and exhibited internationally and has received numerous awards. They address issues of sustainability, affordability and the relationship between form and construction to organize and establish simple formal manifestations of the complexities of each project.

Located in the United States, Canada, and in Europe, their work ranges from residential to commercial, master planning and institutional projects. Residential projects include new buildings, such as DWELL Home II (a prototype for a sustainable house, now under construction), the Jamie residence in Pasadena (a 2000 square foot house lofted on two concrete towers above its precipitous site), the Sola / Wright residence in Mt. Washington (three thermoplastic-wrapped volumes stepping up a hill), as well as work on historic structures, such as the restoration of John Lautner’s Chemosphere in Los Angeles for the German publisher Benedikt Taschen. Commercial and urban projects include a 280,000 square foot shopping center for Redmond, WA.

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Purchase a 2-Day Weekend Pass and receive free tickets to Meet the Architects Reception.

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